The 12 Best Scuba Tanks In 2022

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The scuba tank or diving cylinder is a central piece of equipment for every diver. The tanks hold breathable air under immense pressure and make it possible for us to breathe underwater. It puts the scuba in scuba diving. After we get certified though, many of us splurge on finsmasks, and dive computers, but not on tanks.

Usually, we just rent from the dive center when we go out. This is mostly down to the fact that they are quite heavy, and so not convenient to travel with, and 2. It can be a bit of a daunting decision which one to get. But if you dive a lot locally, it is definitely worth doing your homework and investing in your own scuba diving tank!

To help you, we’ve narrowed down the top scuba tanks that are on the market now! The list has a huge range of variety, suiting all types of divers and their needs!

So what tanks are there?

*weight is an empty tank without a valve unless otherwise stated*

Still unsure as to what scuba tanks to choose? Check out our buying guide to know what to look for when buying a scuba tank.

Top 5 Scuba Tanks in 2022

All the Scuba Tanks We've tested

Best Overall

sherwood-c100-featured
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When Jacques Cousteau invented scuba back in 1942, Sherwood was already a thriving business, producing compressed gas equipment. In the 50s they evolved into the scuba diving brand they are today, making them one of the oldest diving companies globally. 

For over 60years they have produced quality products that put your safety first. Their cylinders come in a range of eye-catching colors, from electric blue, stealth black and hot pink!

Specs & Features

  • Size: 100cu / 13L
  • Weight: 46.2 lbs / 21kg
  • Buoyancy at 500psi: -1lbs
  • Buoyancy at 500psi: -1lbs
  • Height: 30.3 inches / 76.9cm (including valve)

Our Overall Review

4.8

Reasons to buy:

  • check-mark
    Increased size
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    Increased pressure so able to pack in extra air
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    Available in a range of colors for easy ID or personalization
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markIt is a large tank-both length and width
  • check-markIt is a heavy tank
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Sherwood C100

Best Recreational

catalina-s80-featured
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Catalina is one of the top suppliers of scuba tanks, producing them for over 30 years! Catalina Cylinders also manufacture fire extinguishers, medical cylinders, etc., so they are experts in their field. 

Their S80 aluminum Tank is the textbook tank that is instantly recognizable within the diving community. All their cylinders go through a series of tests and are inspected on site.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 678 cu/11.1L
  • Weight: 31.3 lbs/ 14.2 kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -1.6lbs
  • Buoyancy when empty: 4.1
  • Height: 25.9 inches/ 65.8cm

Our Overall Review

4.6

Reasons to buy:

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    Industry-standard so reliably available
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    Good all-rounder
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    Available in a range of colors for easy ID or personalization
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke
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    Reputable brand

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markBuoyancy change from negative to positive
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Catalina S80

Pony Bottle

catalina-pony-featured
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Whether you decide to use it or not, bringing a pony tank on your dive is never a bad idea. Due to its minimal buoyancy change, this particular tank is popular with tec divers. 

It can be used as a stage tank to carry Nitrox mixes, helping to accelerate decompression times. Recreationally, you can bring it on the dive, piggybacking on your main tank. Or perhaps hanging below the boat to use at the safety stop in case of emergency.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 40cu / 5.8L
  • Weight: 16.2lbs/7.3kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -1.5lbs
  • Buoyancy when empty: 1.4
  • Height: 25.4 inches/64.5cm

Our Overall Review

4.6

Reasons to buy:

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    Good specs for pony tank
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    Different sizes available
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markNot for a full-length dive
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Catalina Pony

Great Weight Distribution

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For many, Faber is their go-to brand for scuba cylinders. Their esteemed reputation is due to the fact that all their tanks are made from high-grade steel. Their steel in their tanks is the lightest on the market and made with such precision the weight is uniformly distributed. 

The HP100 is one of their most popular products, great in all styles of diving

Specs & Features

  • Size: 12.9L
  • Weight: 34.0 lbs / 15.6 kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -8.41lbs / 3.8kg
  • Buoyancy when empty: -0.59lbs / -0.27kg
  • Height: 25.3” / 64.5 cm

Our Overall Review

4.5

Reasons to buy:

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    Steel is a more reliable material
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    Same dimensions as standard s80 but increased capacity
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    Stays negative throughout the dive
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke
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    Faber is the best at steel tanks

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markComparatively more expensive
  • check-markHigh-pressure tanks are not always so easily filled
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Faber HP 100

Best for Small Divers

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This tank is well sought-after since it is slightly shorter in size but still holds the same amount of air as a regular aluminum tank, eg Catalina S80. It is the perfect fit for the petite, who are lucky to have low air consumption rates and don’t need any (or minimal) weights. 

It’s lesser length makes it much more comfortable and easier to carry. The constant negative buoyancy means there is no need to bring an extra few pounds as you might with an aluminum. Due to its compact size, it is also worth considering as a twin set as the slimmer profile might help with freer moments.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 80 cu ft / 10.2L
  • Weight: 28.3 lbs / 13.0 kg
  • Buoyancy when full: - 8.05 lbs / -3.65 kg
  • Buoyancy when empty:- 1.74 lbs / -0.79
  • Height: 20.8” / 53.0 cm

Our Overall Review

4.5

Reasons to buy:

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    Steel is a more reliable material
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    Perfect for twin/side-mount
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    Perfect for a smaller diver
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke
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    The shorter length makes for easier movement

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markHigher pressure tanks can be tricky to fill
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Faber HP 80

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Similar to the Catalina CE40, this Faber LP 50 is popular with tec divers as a stage and/or pony tank. Being made of top-notch steel, Faber LP 50 will remain negative when you do use it. 

Made in Italy, their cylinders are very popular in the European market. But be assured its high-quality steel means it meets international standards.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 50cf / 7.8L
  • Weight: 18.9 lbs/ 8.57 kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -2.3lbs
  • Buoyancy when empty: 1.24
  • Height: 25.2"/ 64cm

Our Overall Review

4.3

Reasons to buy:

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    Steel is a more reliable material
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    Low-Pressure tanks are easily filled
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke
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    Good reliable back up/stage bottle

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markNot suitable for a full 45minutes recreational dive
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Faber LP 50 CF

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If Faber HP 80 is a little sister, then Faber HP120 is the big brother. A 15L is perfect for the larger amongst us, who want to level out the playing field. Understandably, the taller and/or bigger you are, the more energy you burn and more air you’ll consume. 

Stop stressing over excess consumption and the buoyancy changes of an aluminum tank, and focus on buoyancy control. And the key to an improved dive is a relaxed state of mind.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 120 cu ft / 15.2L
  • Weight: 36.4lbs / 16.5kg
  • Buoyancy when full: - 8.82 lbs / -4.13 kg
  • Buoyancy when empty:0.65 lbs / 0.29
  • Height: 29.1” / 74.5 cm

Our Overall Review

4.3

Reasons to buy:

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    Steel is a more reliable material
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    Increased volume capacity
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke regulators
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    Perfect for larger divers

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markHigher pressure tanks can be tricky to fill
  • check-markHeavy
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Faber HP 120

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Don’t be surprised if this name rings a bell; Luxfer is the worldwide number one manufacturer of high-pressure composite and cylinders. With over 70 million tanks currently in service-1 million being scuba tanks-it is definitely a brand you can rely upon. 

Luxfer developed the first-ever aluminum SCUBA cylinder with Jacques Cousteau! This paved the way for its LAL80, which is commonplace at a dive center and on  its recreational divers.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 80 cu ft/ 11.1L
  • Weight: 31.5 lbs / 14.3 kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -1.7 lbs / -0.80 kg
  • Buoyancy at 500PSI: 3.4lbs / 1.5kg
  • Height: 26.1” / 66.2 cm

Our Overall Review

4.1

Reasons to buy:

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    Industry-standard aluminum
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    Easily filled
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    Premium grade aluminum
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke regulators
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Luxfer SO80

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If you love high tech fancy gear, then you have to consider the Luxfer 106. It is the world’s highest pressure scuba diving cylinder and the first composite. The pressure rating of 4350PSI offers a phenomenal air capacity and so extra Extra EXTRA dive time! And if you want even more time, the cylinder can hold nitrox/oxygen-rich mixes.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 106 cu ft /
  • Weight: 33.8 lbs / 15.3 kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -4.8 lbs / -2.18 kg
  • Buoyancy at 500PSI: 2.1 lbs / .95 kg
  • Height: 26.1” / 663 mm

Our Overall Review

4

Reasons to buy:

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    Lighter than other 11.1L tanks
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    Higher pressure so can pack in more air

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markNot permitted in Canada
  • check-markCan only be used with DIN regulators
  • check-markCheck that it can be used with your regulator due to increased pressure
  • check-markHigher capacity means a higher chance it’ll be a bugger to fill!
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Luxfer Limited 106

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As you can see the aluminum 80 is the popular template for scuba tanks in the industry, and you can never have too much choice! So it’s no surprise that EDGE/HOG took advantage of this and produced their own version. 

A smaller, lesser-known company, they call themselves a “boutique” brand of scuba diving equipment, priding themselves on their personal touch.

Specs & Features

  • Weight: 31.4lbs /14.2 kg
  • Height: 26.1” / 66.3 cm
  • Buoyancy when full: -1.9 lbs lbs / -0.86 kg
  • Buoyancy when empty: 3.8 lbs / 1.7 kg
  • Material: Aluminum

Our Overall Review

4

Reasons to buy:

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    Industry-standard size
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    Easily filled
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke regulators

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markBuoyancy changes from negative to positive
  • check-markNot a cylinder specific company
Read full review

Where to buy:

edge-cyl-tec-80.jpg

Edge CYL-TEC 80

xs-sea-pearls-80-featured
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Starting off as a diving weight business, their patented belt paved the way for a bigger and better brand to grow. Operating in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Sea Pearls is an extremely well-known and well-liked company in the USA. In 2007 it was acquired by XS Scuba, to warrant any confusion! 

Although Sea Pearls is relatively new to the scuba cylinder world, they operate through Metal Impact who have been in the industry for over 60 years!

Specs & Features

  • Size: 80 cu ft / 11.1L
  • Weight: 31.9lbs /14.5 kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -1.8lbs / -0.8kg
  • Buoyancy at 500PSI: 3.2lbs / 1.45kg
  • Height: 26.1” / 663 mm

Our Overall Review

4

Reasons to buy:

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    Industry-standard size
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke regulators
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    Easily filled
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    Comes in a range of colors

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markBuoyancy changes from negative to positive
Read full review

Where to buy:

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XS Sea Pearls 80

catalina-s63-featured
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The world-renowned Catalina cylinders is a homegrown company, their tanks manufactured in California. They supply scuba divers around the world, in over 100 countries! If you find the regular S80 too big/heavy or perhaps it’s too long on your back, then choose S63. 

Approximately 4 inches shorter and 4lbs lighter, many smaller divers find downsizing makes for a much comfier dive. But don’t worry, downsizing doesn’t mean downgrading! Buying a Catalina cylinder means you will be buying a world-class product.

Specs & Features

  • Size: 63cu / 9L
  • Weight: 27.2lbs/12.3kg
  • Buoyancy when full: -2.8lbs/ -1.3kg
  • Buoyancy when empty: 1.8lbs/0.8kg
  • Height: 21.6inches / 55cm

Our Overall Review

3.9

Reasons to buy:

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    Great tank for smaller divers or children/teenagers
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    Shorter and lighter
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    Can be used with both DIN & Yoke regulators
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    Easily refillable
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    Reputable Brand

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markSmaller tank so not as versatile
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Catalina S63

Related Reviews

BUYING GUIDE

Should I get steel or aluminum?

Pretty much all scuba tanks come in two main materials; aluminum or steel. Aluminum tanks are more popular in the tropical recreational dive centers, whereas steel tanks are more popular with side-mount, tec and deep divers in colder waters.

Neither is better than the other and it just solely depends on how you are physically endowed and your intended use of the tank(s).

Aluminum Prosaluminum tanks are particularly popular in tropical locations as they are less prone to inner corrosion than steel tanks. Many holiday destinations are quite remote and so having tanks that are easy to maintain is a big plus for you and the dive shop.

If you do get any saltwater inside, then it is comparably easier and cheaper to fix. The special coating inside an aluminum tank means the corrosion won’t spread and you can jet wash it away.

Aluminum is much cheaper than steel, so if you need to buy multiple tanks, buying aluminum will burn less of a hole in your pocket.

Aluminum ConsAluminum is lighter and softer, which means it will scratch, dent and crack more easily. Being a softer metal, they cannot withstand the higher pressures that a steel one can.

Most aluminum cylinders have max working pressures of 3000PSI.

Generally, aluminum tanks will start as being 2.2lbs/1kg negative and will become 2.2lbs/1kg buoyant once they hit the 725PSI/50bar mark. So you may have to bring extra weights to compensate for this change.

If you are looking for a casual tank for fun shore dives in warm-tropical waters then aluminum will suit your needs just fine.

Steel Pros

Even though steel is more prone to inner corrosion, this is less an issue in cooler, drier climates, like the USA or Europe. With the proper maintenance, it will last longer.

Steel is strong, so a standard 80cf tank can be a little shorter and thus lighter (approx. 6 inches and 4lbs) than its aluminum cousin. A bonus for teenagers or those of us who are vertically challenged.

Steel tanks will start and end the dive as negative (-8lbs to -2lbs) which is great if you need extra weights or wear a drysuit/thick wetsuit. You can cheat by spreading some of the weight onto the tanks instead of on belt/BCD, and not have to worry about popping up like maybe you would with an aluminum cylinder.

Steel can withstand higher pressures and so if you’re a big fellow who is guzzling air and needs those extra weights, definitely go with a steel tank. Those stronger walls will allow you to pack in more air so you can enjoy a longer dive and feel freer with fewer weights adorning your waistline, eventually improving your diving technique.

Steel Cons 

Since steel is stronger than aluminum, you’d be forgiven to think it’s the better and popular choice. But durability comes at a price, and that can be nearly double in some cases. But most argue that it’s worth the investment.

Steel is denser so when comparing two tanks (aluminum and steel) of the same height, steel will be heavier. (eg Catalina AL63 vs Faber Steel HP80) And it doesn’t get much lighter throughout the dive. A full high-pressured 17L steel tank is about 50lbs!

If you get any salt water inside then it doesn’t take long for rust to begin and ruin your tank.

Steel tanks are the standard of tec and side-mount divers due to their longevity and their added weight.

To decide what material to pick, remember to consider where you are in the world, your physique, your wants/needs and your financial budget.

But what size should I get?

Ok, you’ve decided to go with steel/aluminum. But now you have to decide what size to go with. To help explain, we are going to compare four different tanks, highlighting their similarities and differences.

Short Steel Faber HP80, 10.2L

Compared to the Catalina AL63, the Faber steel is much heavier (5.3lbs) and thus a higher volume capacity (13%, 1.2L). The Faber has a service pressure of 3442PSI, packing approx. 10% more liters than the Catalina. This is beneficial for tec divers, where every liter of air matters and they want to be as efficient as possible.

Say you’re diving tec side-mount and need 4 tanks; that extra 10% is now a 40% volume increase!  Their shorter length will allow for freer movements.  Also, those heavier steel tanks have minimal buoyancy loss, which is a bonus since you can be less concerned about how many weights you need on your belt or BCD.

Short aluminum Catalina AL63, 9L

Catalina AL63 is often used by teenagers or women/smaller framed divers. It is 5 inches or 10cm shorter than the industry AL80 and so much easier to carry. Often dive centers will supply these shorter tanks to cater to their smaller guests.

If you are on the shorter side, then it makes sense to get a shorter tank to better suit you physically! Also smaller divers tend to have better air consumption and so can make do with a tank with slightly less volume. If in warmer waters means you probably are wearing no/minimal thermal protection so you don’t need heaps of weights. And so the buoyancy change from positive doesn’t really affect you.

Standard aluminum Luxfer LAL80, 11.1L

The 26-inch, 11.1L tank is the goldilocks of tanks-not too big, not too small, nor too heavy. It fits everyone just right! (Well, nearly everyone!) For many of us, when dive recreationally with a dive center in warm waters, this is the tank we receive.

The standard 11.1L does the job of an everyday-use tank very well, being of middle size and holding enough air to last most of us a 45-60-minute dive. Mid-range pressure tanks (3000 PSI) like this Luxfer are accepted by any dive centers, so filling it won’t be a problem; high-pressure tanks, 3400PSI+, are more demanding on a compressor so not all centers will be willing to fill them.

So for example, if you are living by warm waters, are of regular build and want your own tank so you and your buddies can do regular shore dives, then the 11.1L will suit your needs just fine.

Large Steel Faber HP120, 15.2L

Lastly looking at the Faber HP120, this is one of the largest of the tanks. This tank has very specific features that only really cater to a specific diver. A 15L is perfect for the larger amongst us, who tend to need more air to supply their big physique.

Understandably, the taller and/or bigger you are, the more energy you burn and hence more air you’ll consume. The Faber HP120 is a longer tank as well so that could help with your trim if you find the 80cf/11.1L tank a little short on your back.

Often new (and/or bigger) divers who are initially struggling with air consumption and trim etc., are offered 15L. This allows them to stop stressing over excess consumption and the buoyancy changes of an aluminum tank. Now they can relax and improve their buoyancy control. And being relaxed diving is obviously the ultimate goal for all of us!

So you can see what size you choose is mostly based on two factors: your intended use–recreational or tec diving; and your physique–smaller body=smaller tanks, larger body=larger tanks.

To finish off check out this video and find out how scuba tanks are made and their history!

ACCESSORIES

Tank Boots

A tank boot is a plastic cover that is for the bottom of your tank. Definitely, something we recommend for most tanks, especially since some steel tanks are curved at the base and cant stand without one.

A tank boot is beneficial as protection if you are constantly placing your tank on a hard surface. Often after a dive, the tanks & BCDs can get flung to the floor and the tank boot deters any bumps with hard surfaces. The boot is hollow and so it’s self-draining.

Try this one!

Nets/Mesh

Feel free to google “scuba tank mesh” and be entertained by the numerous forums endlessly debating for and against the mesh! Essentially it is a cylindrical net that covers the tank, which can stop minor scrapes and scratches and protect potential paintwork.

You get a cover for your phone, so why wouldn’t you for your tank right? They come in many snazzy colors, helping to distinguish you (or your guide) underwater, and adding some extra flair to your gear!

Which color will you choose?

Holders

Tank holders or a cylinder rack are definitely a necessity for driving-to-destination divers. Most of the variants are in a lying down position and help to keep your cylinders secure in the trunk as you drive. This means you can drive around without having to worry that your tanks are banging up the back of the car. Better for your tanks, your car and your sanity!

We like this one the best!

Extra O-rings

Bring spare o-rings, and you will be everyone’s best buddy, including your own! There is nothing more annoying than doing your final safety check only to hear that horrifying hiss slowly leaking from the valve. This nifty little gizmo is a cute little scuba tank, full of spare o-rings and a pick to pry out the old ones!

Get it here!

Din insert

If you choose a Yoke/A-clamp regulator then for sure you should carry a din insert in your bag of spare kit. Any dive center worth its salt (water) will have these readily available. But it’s never a bad idea to have your own insert and tools with you just in case. Just remember not to leave the insert in the valve if it’s not your own tank!

You can pick them up here.

Hopefully, this guide helped to clear up most of your scuba tank questions!

If you have any specific cylinder queries, comment below and we’d be happy to answer them below.

FAQ

Frequently asked questions

How much does a scuba tank cost?

Obviously like with anything it depends on size and quality. A standard aluminum is approximately $300 – excluding valve.

What valve should I get?

There are two ways to attach your regulator to your tank. Either through a Yoke adapter or a DIN connection. With a Yoke, you place it over the valve and screw it shut from behind the valve. DIN screws directly into the valve. Just remember; DIN SCREW IN. If you do have a yoke regulator it obviously makes sense to get a Yoke-only valve.

However, it is becoming more and more popular to have a combination valve. Which is basically a DIN tank with an interchangeable yoke insert. This way both kinds of regulators are usable with the valve, and all you need is an Allen key to remove/add the insert.

*A note on terminology here. A-clamps are also called Yokes, INT, and international. These terms are interchangeable.*

What size should I get?

If you’re purchasing the tank for recreational use, then the standard aluminum 80cu ft/11.1L will suit you. Its popularity will make it easily accepted by dive shops/centers to fill.

If you are larger, you might only last 45 minutes. Upgrade to a larger 120cu/15.2L tank and you will gain a longer dive.

If you are smaller, most likely you can stretch a regular 80cu ft/11.1L cyclinder to 75 minutes. Maybe choose a smaller AL63 tank then that will last 45 minutes-one hour

What is the lifespan of a tank?

With proper maintenance and not excessive use (like in a dive shop) then you can stretch it to 15-20years.

How often does it need to be inspected?

All tanks should receive a visual inspection once a year and a hydrostatic inspection every 5 years in the USA. Check with the manufacturer for specific information.

How much does a refill cost?

From  $5-$20 depending on where in the world you are.

Are all tanks nitrox ready?

All tanks are serviced and ready to use all mixes. However, it is the valve on the tank which will determine what mix/blend can you fill into the tank.

Do they come with a valve?

Tanks are produced as an empty shell, but often suppliers will have a valve to purchase as an add-on so that it is delivered together and ready to use. Be sure to check the clamp on your regulator so that your regs and your tanks fit together! See what regulators we recommend for 2022!

Are there any accessories/extras I should know about?

Of course! As always with scuba diving, there is always a multitude of gadgets and gizmos! There are tank boots, tank nets/mesh, tank holders, extra O-rings and DIN adapters, for example. Read more about them here.

Hopefully, this guide helped to clear up most of your scuba tank questions!

If you have any specific cylinder queries, comment below and we’d be happy to answer them below.

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