Top 11 Freediving Fins of 2022

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So you’re looking at getting into freediving, or perhaps you’re already advanced and looking for a new pair of fins that’ll get you that record depth.

All freediving fins serve the same purpose despite any differences they may have in material, stiffness, or price. They generally have a closed rubber heel and long blade design to propel you with an efficient power transfer from your legs to your fins.

With the variety of products coming on the market annually, choosing a pair of fins can be an intimidating task, but worry not, at Divein.com we’ve done the research for you. By the time you finish reading this all-you-need-to-know guide, you will have a far greater idea of which freediving fins are best for you.

In this article, we’ll go through the best freediving fins on the market.

The Top 5 Freediving Fins in 2022

All the Freediving Fins We've tested

Beuchat Mundial Elite Featured Image
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We’re starting this guide off strong with one of the best entry-level freediving fins out there to date, the Beuchat Mundial Elites.

These Beuchat Freedive Fins have a stiff full foot construction with concentrated but dynamic propulsion, making them ideal for larger or heavier beginners. These fins will appeal to all those looking to try out freediving, in full confidence that comfort and power will not be an issue.

The Beuchat Mundial Elites are one of the best entry-level freediving fins available today. To summarize, features such as the strong full foot design, the interchangeable, portable, and upgradeable medium stiffness blade, and the stabilizer blades for enhanced control make them great.

It’s a highly recommended pair of freediving fins for beginners who are heavier (170-200 lbs) or more athletic (ie. stronger). These fins will appeal to anybody interested in giving freediving a try since they will provide both comfort and power.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Dual material technopolymer
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Medium
  • Removable blade: Yes

Our Overall Review

4.9

Reasons to buy:

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    Affordable considering the high quality that you get
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    Long stiff design for a powerful kick, good for swimming in currents
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    The blade extends beneath the sole for an efficient and comfortable experience
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    Blade stabilizers added to channel water flow and enhance trajectory
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    Removable blade makes these easy to pack for travel

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markQuite stiff so may not be ideal for smaller or less athletic beginners
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Beuchat Mundial Elite

Excellent for the Entry-level Freediver

oceanic-predator-freediving-fins-test.jpg
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Excellent for the entry-level free diver, the Oceanic Predator Freediving Fins exhibit a rigid design with a focused yet dynamic propulsion. Apnea divers and spearfishers alike looking for a relaxed and elegant finning experience will be interested in these fins.

Apnea divers and spearfishers alike looking for a relaxed and elegant finning experience will be interested in these fins. The Oceanic Predators come in a full-foot design, including a handy heel tab for pulling the fins on and off with greater ease. The long blade is ribbed, allowing for a streamlined motion in the water as well as greater efficiency.

You may have noticed that these freediving fins are not designed with an interchangeable fin blade, meaning that some of the benefits for traveling and upgrading are therefore lacking from this product.

What we find with fully integrated blade fins such as the Oceanic Predator fins is that the power transfer is extremely focused and efficient as no energy is lost through screws, clips on the side rails and they are notably lighter than many other separate blade designs.

Combined with the soft stiffness feature of the blade, we recommend these freediving fins for any beginner looking to get into freediving and spearfishing.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Thermal plastic rubber (TPR) and polypropylene
  • Full foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Soft
  • Removable blade: No

Our Overall Review

4.8

Reasons to buy:

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    This is an excellent pair of fins for beginners
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    Long rigid design generates exceptional propulsion
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    Extremely efficient and comfortable
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    The heel tab makes them easy to don and doff
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    Stylish color and design which is sure to attract some compliments

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markWithout dive boots or socks heel friction occurs
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Oceanic Predator

Cressi Gara Modular Impulse Featured Image
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One of our favorite freediving fins on the market, the Cressi Gara Modular Impulse fins with fiberglass blades are ideal for efficient use of energy. They also hit a nice price-for-performance mark.

The fin boasts many thought-out and purpose-built features which tell you the manufacturers were thinking about delivering superior performance, in and out of the water.

The three words that come to mind with this product are efficiency, comfort, lightweight.

We weren’t too sure what to expect when trying these fins on but, boy did they impress. While the stiffness of the fiberglass blade is on the softer side, you may still elicit an incredible snap response from them.

Additionally, the blades are complemented with water rails along the side of the blade to prevent any lateral sliding which can be useful to weaker freedivers. What’s more is that–as implied in the name–these fins have a modular design which means that the interchangeable blade can be upgraded to carbon fiber in the future
for optimal performance.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Dual material, fiberglass
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Soft
  • Removable blade: Yes

Our Overall Review

4.6

Reasons to buy:

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    Extremely high-quality fiberglass blade for power and durability
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    Dual material foot pocket features flexibility on the foot’s bridge with rigidness around the foot for extra comfort and energy transfer
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    Soul grips for extra safety when walking around on a boat
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    You don’t need extra neoprene socks for this foot pocket
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    Side ribs added to channel water flow and enhance trajectory

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markNothing yet
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Cressi Gara Modular Impulse

Best for Advanced Freedivers

Mares X Wing Featured Image
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For the more seasoned freedivers and even professionals, the Mares X-Wing Carbon has one of the most responsive blades on the market.

With an incredibly snug foot pocket that’s excellent for a small, high kick frequency. This particular product has the widest blade of the Mares X-Wing family at 20cm, making it particularly powerful for experienced and athletic individuals.

A removable blade is so nice for traveling too.

Upon being lucky enough to try this exquisite pair of freediving fins, we are confident that ‘you get what you pay for’ with the Mares X-Wing Carbon. The benefits of wearing such a high-quality product are experienced right from the get-go; you will find the elastic heel tab on the back of the foot pocket makes life easy when donning the fins and we even took off the interchangeable blade to walk around our boat with ease, taking only two minutes to re-attach.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Carbon fiberglass
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: Yes
  • Blade stiffness: Medium / Soft
  • Removable blade: Yes

Our Overall Review

4.6

Reasons to buy:

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    Extremely high-quality carbon fiberglass blade for power and durability
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    Blade stiffness options accessible for people with different weights
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    You don’t need extra neoprene socks for this foot pocket
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    Side ribs added to channel water flow and enhance trajectory
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    Removable blade makes these easy to pack for travel and repair

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markThe quality of this blade comes at a steep price
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Mares X-Wing

Best for Spearfishing

Oceanic Enzo Featured Image
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Designed specifically for open-water hunting and freediving, the Enzo freediving fin is made from unique composite construction materials. It’s one of the more reasonably priced fins too.

A polypropylene composite material alloy forms the main body of the blade while the foot pockets are made from thermoplastic rubber, soft along the bridge of the foot for comfort, and hard all around for efficient energy transfer to the blade.

The Oceanic Enzo freediving fin offers sublime comfort while ensuring a strong kick, suitable for beginners at a fair price.

Above we draw your attention to the fact that the freediving fin blades are not replaceable on these fins. It is, therefore, true that this product does not offer some of the advantages of traveling and upgrading. However, with completely integrated blade fins such as the Oceanic Enzo fins, power transfer is very concentrated and efficient since there is no energy lost through screws or clips on the water rails along the side of the blade.

We recommend these freediving fins for any novice who wants to get into freediving and spearfishing because of the soft stiffness of the blade.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Thermal plastic rubber (TPR) and polypropylene
  • Full foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Soft
  • Removable blade: No

Our Overall Review

4.5

Reasons to buy:

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    This is an excellent pair of fins for beginners
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    Long rigid design generates exceptional propulsion
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    Extremely efficient and comfortable
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    Soft blade stiffness good for smaller or older people
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    There are a lot of blade channels that improve water flow off the fin

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markWithout dive boots or socks heel friction occurs
Omer Stingray Evo Featured Image
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The Omer Stingray line has delivered one of its more unique and interesting designs in the new EVO product, ideal for spearfishing mainly, but also freediving. This will appeal to more experienced finners.

The new khaki brown color makes them visible on the surface, but you remain camouflaged when hunting down on a sandy seabed. The long keyhole in the center of the blade improves performance by channeling water and directing the blade during movement.

In addition, the hole reduces the amount of force required to move the fin in the blade’s less ‘active’ section, as most of the elastic energy is released at the tip.

Omer has pulled this one out of the bag, producing one of the best freediving fins on the market. Low-modular polypropylene material is used to create these Stingray fins. As a result, they have a medium firmness that is an ideal balance between being overly soft or rigid, great for a strong or heavy beginner.

The blade’s water ribs are the first thing you’ll notice in your first dive with these fins as the water is more efficiently directed; giving you more control and spring simultaneously.

Finally, what’s cool is that, while a traditional full-foot design is included, the boot-to-blade angle sits at 22 degrees instead of the typical 15 or 17-degree angle. Research has shown that this design enhances your range of motion, which is the most effective way to increase your forward propulsion.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Thermal plastic rubber (TPR) and polypropylene
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Medium
  • Removable blade: Yes

Our Overall Review

4.4

Reasons to buy:

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    This is an excellent pair of fins for the seasoned spearfisher
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    Rigid design generates exceptional propulsion
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    Ribbed and keyhole baring blade helps to conserve energy and oxygen for a longer bottom time
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    Brown color ideal for remaining hidden among rocks and sand
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    Removable blade makes this fin ideal for traveling and upgrading

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markWithout neoprene socks, heel friction occurs
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Omer Stingray EVO

Mako Freedive Hunter Featured Image
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The Mako Freediving Hunter freediving fins offer excellent performance for beginners as they are comfortable and easy to use. A lot of quality for the price here.

These freediving fins are of excellent quality and feature fixed blades (permanently connected to the foot pockets). The foot pockets are soft where needed for comfort, yet firmer around the metatarsal area for enhanced energy transmission.

The blade is composed of a polypropylene composite material that is both flexible and robust and is intended to maximize thrust and stability. These freediving fins are certainly in the running for the spot of best price to quality ratio on the market.

In addition to hunting gear, it’s clear that MAKO Spearguns make some excellent freediving fins. A polypropylene composite material is used for the fins in the Hunter line, which is intended to provide both propulsion and stability. As a result, freedivers can propel themselves as much as possible, experiencing an impressive spring with each kick, while using the least amount of effort.

Finally, we found these fins to be truly comfortable; it is obvious that to create the foot pocket, MAKO drew on their many years of diving expertise. To improve comfort, certain sections have been made softer, while others have been stiffened for optimum flexibility and efficiency.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Thermal plastic rubber (TPR) and polypropylene
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Medium
  • Removable blade: No

Our Overall Review

4.4

Reasons to buy:

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    This is an excellent pair of fins for beginner freedivers and underwater hunters
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    Long rigid design generates exceptional propulsion
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    Ribbed blade ensures the water is channeled correctly for enhanced control
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    Amazingly low-cost when buying directly from MAKO

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markAs the blade isn’t interchangeable, some Tetris-style thinking may be required when it comes to packing
Read full review

Where to buy:

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MAKO Freedive Hunter

Bare Predator Featured Image
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The new Bare Predator Freediving Fins include a complete foot design and an expanded blade, which provide a solid kick and optimum comfort for freedivers.

Every stroke is propelled efficiently thanks to the medium stiffness blade. The Bare Predator Freediving Fins were designed specifically for underwater hunters who are looking for some speed. These freediving fins don’t come with replaceable fin blades, as you’ve likely already observed.

BARE Predator fins are a great example of a completely integrated blade fin, which eliminates the need for screws, clips, and side rail clips – all potential points of energy leak if they get loose. They are also far lighter than many other separate blade designs, which makes them a great choice for traveling and upgrading.

For those who are new to freediving and spearfishing, we propose these freediving fins, which include a soft stiffness characteristic in the blade.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Thermal plastic rubber (TPR) and polypropylene
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Medium
  • Removable blade: No

Our Overall Review

4.2

Reasons to buy:

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    Long rigid design generates exceptional propulsion
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    The sheer surface area on these fins is very powerful
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    The heel tab makes them easy to don and doff
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    The product is available in both blue and black camo, always nice to have some choice of color!
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    Medium stiffness combined with widening tip ideal for strong swimmers and experienced spearfishers

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markWithout dive boots or socks, heel friction occurs
  • check-markNot great for smaller or less experienced freedivers as an efficient stroke requires strength and good technique
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Bare Predator

Mares Razor Matrix Featured Image
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The blade of the new Mares Razor Matrix freediving fins are made up of layers of carbon fiber and glass fiber.

With replaceable blades, these fins are ideal for experienced freedivers. The side-rail and stinger design improves water flow toward the V-shaped tip, improving propulsion and decreasing leg stress due to the design. As a word of advice, however, make sure you wear a 3mm neoprene sock with these to avoid any risk of forming blisters – what a way to ruin a dive day!

These high-quality fins provide an unrivaled acceleration and reaction combination because the blade boasts varying thicknesses along its length, finishing with a fishtail tip to create an outstanding parabolic bend.

This product is ideal for both advanced and experienced freedivers who know how to make the most of the technical detail in these fins.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Carbon fiberglass layering
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: Yes
  • Blade stiffness: Medium / Soft
  • Removable blade: Yes

Our Overall Review

4.2

Reasons to buy:

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    Extremely high-quality carbon fiberglass blade for power and durability
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    Blade stiffness options accessible for people with different weights
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    The variable thickness along the blade offers dynamic propulsion and responsiveness
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    Side ribs added to channel water flow and enhance trajectory
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    Removable blade makes these easy to pack for travel and repair

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markThe quality of this blade comes at a steep price
  • check-markNeoprene socks are required for a comfortable experience
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Mares Razor Matrix

Cressi Gara Modular Sprint Featured Image
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These next freedive fins ooze quality, especially for competitive freedivers looking for speed who can really use the technical details to their advantage.

 

 

The Cressi Gara line has once again impressed with another stunning pair of freedive fins. The Cressi Gara Modular Sprint fins were designed utilizing costly finite element software packages that enable the design of very complex and high-caliber sections.

As if that’s not enough, Cressi developed their elastomer thermoplastic compound and can maintain quality right from the start of the material production line. The blades provide a novel method of elastic potential energy storage and release, substantially helping the freediver’s leg movement and ensuring an increase in power.

What’s the difference between Cressi’s Modular Spring vs Modular Impulse? While they have similarities in material composition, blade detachability, water rails, and even price, the ‘devilfish’ is in the detail, as they say. In short the Modular Spring provides speed while the Modular Impulse offers energy efficiency.

The Modular Spring fins, you’ll find, are essentially almost 20cm shorter and angled slightly lower than the Modular Impulse freediving fins, creating a more prominent spring in the flutter kick as the boot-to-fin energy transfer is more focused. The Modular Spring fins are ideal for freedivers looking for improved propulsion and speed, at the risk of spending more energy than with the efficient Modular Impulse Freediving Fin.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Dual material, elastomer thermoplastic
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Medium
  • Removable blade: Yes

Our Overall Review

4.2

Reasons to buy:

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    Extremely high-quality elastomer thermoplastic blade for huge propulsion
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    Dual material features self-adjusting foot pockets for enhanced comfort
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    Soul grips for extra safety when walking around on a boat
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    Side ribs added to channel water flow and enhance trajectory
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    Removable blade makes these easy to pack for travel and repair

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markSome find the foot pocket is quite large so it might be wise to order a size down to avoid friction on the heel
Read full review

Where to buy:

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Cressi Gara Modular Sprint

Mako Womens Competition Freediver II Featured Image
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Women with smaller feet have, in the past, lacked access to high-quality freediving fins that fit properly. MAKO set to work after noticing a trend in their FAQs among competitive women freedivers.

As with other high-quality MAKO freediving fins, these foot pockets are made with materials that vary in stiffness to achieve the best performance in both comfort and energy transfer.

In addition, the blades are designed with a soft stiffness which is recommended for people with small builds. Finally, one can’t ignore the gorgeous camo design feature on the blade which is sure to attract a few compliments.

Specs & Features

  • Material: Thermal plastic rubber (TPR) and polypropylene
  • Full Foot
  • Stiffness Options: No
  • Blade stiffness: Soft
  • Removable blade: Yes

Our Overall Review

4

Reasons to buy:

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    This is an excellent pair of fins for experienced female freedivers as they feature smaller foot pockets for a tight fit
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    Long bendy design stores and releases exceptional elastic energy transfer
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    The side rails ensure the water is channeled correctly for enhanced control
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    Amazingly low-cost when buying directly from MAKO
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    Multiple color designs are available with an accompanying wetsuit if desired

Reasons NOT to buy:

  • check-markNeoprene socks are recommended or you may find you get blisters after your first couple of dives with these
Read full review

Where to buy:

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MAKO Women’s Competition Freediver II

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Buyer’s Guide to Freediving Fins

When you watch all those insane 200m plus depths achieved by freedivers on youtube, what is the first you notice? It’s their fish-like fins!

You can’t help but be mesmerized by the way they parabolically bend when a freediver uses them. Apart from looking cool, have you ever wondered why freediving fins are so much longer than regular swimming or scuba fins? Freedivers actually use elongated freediving fins instead of scuba fins for technical reasons.

Moving through water requires displacing it, and since freediving fins have a bigger surface area, they do it with greater force. Known as the ‘snap’, a freediver gets a second surge of force from the end of the freediving fin’s blade, which makes them more efficient.

However, length unfortunately is not the only criterion to look out for when buying your next pair of freediving fins and the number of options available might be a bit daunting. Here is a guide on what you should look out for when choosing freediving fins:

Blade Types

Fixed Blade Fins

Fins for freediving beginners are generally bi-fins with a fixed blade. This is when the blades are firmly connected to the foot pockets. As an entry-level freediving fin, these fixed thermoplastic blades are ideal. They are cheap and long-lasting, but as you develop, you may discover that they get stiff and less responsive.

Fins With Interchangeable Blades

Due to performance and practical considerations, intermediate and advanced freedivers tend to use freediving fins with interchangeable blades (also known as modular freediving fins). Buying modular freediving fins is a fantastic idea from many perspectives since you can start with the less expensive, less reactive thermoplastic blades and advance to more powerful fiberglass or even carbon blades as you gain experience and control.

An additional benefit of modular bi-fins is that you may purchase the foot pockets and blades separately. This means you can mix and match foot pockets from different brands, or blades from different brands. If in doubt, check with the manufacturer.

Monofins

Monofins are also worthy of mention. They were designed in order to produce maximum power production with minimal effort. CWT (constant weight discipline) fins are mostly used for pool training and competitions as it is difficult to change direction with a monofin. Therefore these are not suitable for beginners or even intermediates as they are not designed for enjoyment and exploration. It’s worth considering keeping monofin training if you feel like you would like to improve your fin abilities.

Material

Blade Materials

Once you have made your decision about the type of blade you want, it will be time to add the material make-up to your decision-making process. There are three main types of materials used in freediving fins and we’ve listed them here with pros and cons, just for you.

Thermoplastic Polymer

(Recommended for beginners)

Fiberglass

(Great for advanced freedivers and spearfishers)

Carbon Fiber

(Used for competitions)

Pros

  • Durable
  • Low price
  • Very effective
  • Reasonable pricing
  • Incredible efficiency
  • High performing
  • Light

Cons

  • Less efficient
  • Cold water rigidity
  • Can be scratched easily
  • Very Costly

Blade Stiffness

Having the most expensive blades in the world won’t make you more efficient if the stiffness isn’t right for you. If the blade material is too soft you won’t be able to get much force out of your fins, whereas if they are too hard even the strongest swimmers in the world will exhaust themselves before they hit any kind of record.

There is a common misconception among freedivers that deeper dives require stiffer fin blades. In actuality, the stiffness should match your musculature.

It is suggested that freedivers who are beginners or who weigh less than 150lbs use soft-blade fins. If you are a larger freediver, or perhaps if you are advanced and have developed a good technique with those new calf muscles, medium stiffness is the most popular choice.

Getting the Right Fit

Generally speaking, all freediving fins will have a closed heel foot pocket design for the optimum power transmission and are available in a variety of colors and styles.

Your fins act as an extension of your legs, therefore your foot pockets need to be snug enough to keep your fins in place to transfer as much energy as possible from your legs through to the blade tip. As a rule of thumb, the more comfortable your feet are, the more efficient your strokes will be.

You can tighten them up by wearing thicker neoprene socks or using fin keepers if they’re a little too loose. When it comes to comfort vs power, a high-quality freediving fin will include a softer flexible material at the ankle, bridge and at the toes, but a harder, strengthened material where it counts for better energy transmission.

We usually suggest renting or borrowing a variety of freediving equipment and testing it out before making a purchase.

Finally, always test on new fins before entering the water, and kick your foot a little to ensure they’re not moving at all – getting a blister on your heel is a pretty nasty way to start your day at sea.

FAQ

Frequently asked questions

What are the best freediving fins?

There are many good freediving fins, but to be the best freediving fins they must excel in several different factors.

Check out our list of best freediving fins:

  • Beuchat Mundial Elite Freedive Fins
  • Mares X-Wing Freedive Fins
  • Oceanic Predator Freedive Fins
  • Cressi Gara Modular Impulse Freedive Fins
  • Oceanic Enzo Freedive Fins
  • Omer Stingray EVO Freedive Fins
  • Mako Freedive Hunter Freediving Fins
  • Bare Predator Freediving Fins
  • Mares Razor Matrix Freedive Fins
  • Cressi Gara Modular Sprint Freedive Fins
  • Mako Women’s Competition Freediver II Freedive Fins

Read this article to find out the best freediving fins.

How to store freediving fins?

The best way to store freediving fins is by laying them flat on a smooth surface to avoid strap damage. Make sure to keep them out of direct sunlight as this will damage the fins over time.

How to travel with freediving fins?

You can bring your freediving fins with you wherever you travel. If the blades on your freediving fins are removable you can take them apart and take them on a plane with you as carry on baggage.

However, if your freediving fins can’t be taken apart, you’ll have to put them in your checked baggage, preferably in a case, so they are not damaged.

For more information on traveling with dive equipment, check out this article.

How to use freediving fins?

The correct way to use freediving fins is through even and controlled fin strokes to ensure maximum propulsion for the least amount of effort.

Check out this article on finning techniques for more information on how to get the most out of your fins.

Why are freediving fins so long?

Freediving fins are so long because they need to displace more water for every kick cycle. This is so that the diver wastes less energy with every kick as they can cover more distance while conserving oxygen and energy. This is especially important when freediving, as you have limited oxygen, and the more energy you use, depletes this reserve.

Check out the best freediving fins by reading this article.

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