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Reviewed by our Snowboarders:

BEST SNOWBOARD BINDINGS OF 2021

Z

Our experts at work

We gave our Gear lovers one job:

Find 22 different Snowboard Bindings and write reviews of the best.

The result is 11 of the best Snowboard Bindings on the market today.

torben lonne

Jess McPhail

Snowboarder

Bradley Axmith boating & sailing editor

Bradley Axmith

Editor at DIVEIN.com
Vikingship building gear enthusiast and waterworld fanatic.

Snowboard bindings have evolved dramatically over the years since the sport began. In the early days of snowboarding, the binding actually came before the dedicated snowboard boot.

When the “highback” binding was finally commercialized, it stuck as the most important factor in achieving board control and the ability to make turns.

Whether you plan to lap the park and learn new tricks or charge in the backcountry, selecting the right bindings is crucial. Their flex will either compliment the board or hold it back. So know the flex of your board too!

Below you’ll find our top 10 lists for the best snowboard bindings-including all mountain, freeride & freestyle models.

Top 11 Snowboard Bindings

See our quick top 11, or go further down and read our in-depth reviews.

Still unsure as to what snowboard bindings to choose? Check out our buying guide to know what to look for when buying a snowboard bindings.

Burton Cartel X bindings take everything you know and love about the classic Cartel binding to the next level. With a new and improved ultra-stiff highback, you get the powerful and responsive feel of a super expensive top of the line binding, for a very reasonable price.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: All mountain
  • Ability Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Flex: Stiff
  • Binding Type: step-in
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: 1 Year
What we like:
  • Hammock Strap 2.0 for the ankle and Capstrap 2.0 toe strap designs provide durable support and increased grip
  • FullBED cushioning and B3 Gel provide max comfort.
  • DialFLAD and Living Hinge highback technology allows for independent adjustment of highback rotation and forward lean.
  • Compatible with all major mounting systems.
  • Flex Slider allows the ankle strap to fall completely open, making sliding your boot in much easier.
What we don’t like:
  • Tools required for making adjustments.

With Burton’s innovative Heel Hammock gripping the heel of your boot and holding it strongly in place, the stiff highback enables you to drive power down into the board. They also feature a stiffer, more powerful baseplate to provide more efficient energy transfer.

While hot spots or pinch points are often an issue with other stiff bindings, fully malleable and well-designed straps, FullBED cushioning, and B3 Gel underfoot provide the ultimate in binding comfort.

Union Force bindings are the tried and true hero of 100+ day-a-year, all-mountain-shredding, season pass holders. Built to handle whatever conditions are thrown their way, these bindings have been among the top go-to all-mountain bindings for years now, living up to their impressive reputation.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: All mountain
  • Ability Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Flex: Stiff
  • Binding Type: step-in
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: Limited Lifetime (Baseplate & Heelcups), 1 Year (All Other Parts)
What we like:
  • Extremely durable with Duraflex St baseplate and highback.
  • Trusted ExoFrame strap design with easy tool-less adjustment.
  • Long-lasting Multi-Density Thermoformed EVA bushings.
  • Ultra-strong magnesium buckles and Grade 8.8 hardware
  • Compatible with most major mounting systems.
What we don’t like:
  • Screws have been known to work themselves loose without warning.
  • Not compatible with Burton 3D mounting system.

Known for their bomb-proof design, the strongest heel cups in the business increase heel hold and provide minimization of drag. This means you can rest assured that none of that important force will be lost in your turns.

Combined with the improved Duraflex St highback and baseplate, magnesium buckles, and Grade 8.8 hardware, these bindings are built to last.

Bent Metal’s Axtion bindings are a highly adjustable, light-weight, all-mountain masterpiece. These medium flex bindings feature a uni-body nylon chassis to help absorb vibrations, while Featherlight ankle strap padding and a lightweight structural core with a magnesium fibre baseplate make sure comfort is not compromised.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: All mountain
  • Ability Level: Intermediate
  • Flex: Medium
  • Binding Type: step-in
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: 1Year
What we like:
  • Uni-body nylon chassis design to absorb vibrations and provide a smooth ride.
  • Highly adjustable for comfortable fit and reliable performance.
  • Featherweight padding and overall lightweight design.
  • Hardened forged aluminum buckles for lightweight durability.
  • Handy tool-less adjustments.
What we don’t like:
  • Only black and white colorways to choose from.
  • As a less common brand, parts for repair might be harder to source.
  • Not compatible with Burton 3D mounting system

Bent Metal’s revolutionary Cube forward lean adjuster, interchangeable Flex Drive Plates, and adjustable toe ramp make these bindings incredibly versatile. With just a few quick tweaks, the whole ride experience can be changed to suit the conditions at hand.

These snowboard bindings will fit most boards and work well with most boots. They look pretty cool and feel firm but comfortable too.

Since Flow is the authority in rear-entry binding systems thus far, the Fenix makes our list as a great speed-entry (hybrid) binding option. Flow’s active strap technology allows the foot strap to move up slightly when the highback is opened, to allow the foot to slide in without having to loosen the straps first

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: All mountain
  • Ability Level: Intermediate
  • Flex: Medium
  • Binding Type: Speed-Entry (Hybrid)
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Burton 3D, Channel
  • Warranty: 1 Year
What we like:
  • Set-and-forget rear-entry system for quick transition from chairlift to run.
  • Asymmetrical baseplate design with improved offset cable attachments.
  • Power triangle high-tensile steel cable for efficient power transfer.
  • Lightweight, supportive, and comfortable high-back design.
  • Active Strap technology for ease of use.
What we don’t like:
  • Speed-entry bindings often come with the "not a real snowboarder" stigma.
  • Parts for repair are harder to source.

What’s pretty nice is the ability to use the straps as you would a regular binding is still there, in case you’re feeling nostalgic.

All new lightweight Fusion ExoFrame PowerStraps combined with a high-tensile steel cable provide optimal power transfer to the board for improved response and control. These bindings also feature an asymmetrical baseplate with a slightly rockered design, which allows for a more natural, medium flex and ease of use.

Salomon injected new life into their boarding gear by innovating a new bindings system called shadowfit. The Salomon Hologram bindings are an intermediate and up freestyle binding that will also serve you well freeriding.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: Freestyle & Freeriding
  • Ability Level: Intermediate
  • Flex: Medium
  • Binding Type: Strap
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Burton 3D, Channel
  • Warranty: 1 Year
What we like:
  • Super comfortable Shadowfit rocks
  • versatile enough to rock the park, the resort and the backcountry
  • Upgrades make it very responsive
  • Great support
  • Good synergy with board
What we don’t like:
  • Check back later…

The Shadowfit system incorporates new support technologies that provide a great flexibility and support to give the soft freestyle profile as well as the stiffness and response for hard charging, freeriding.

It starts with the flexible heel cup that is one of the softest around. It Envelops your heel, transferring the movements ever so nicely. The EVA toe strap does the same, pushing your foot into the cup, assisted by a Kevlar wire like a vice, without any discomfort.

The ankle straps are comfortable and they stay locked. Nuff said.

With a rigid composite baseplate and asymmetric highback that twists with your calf, but pushes back too, it catches that sweet spot for intermediate riders that don’t have the cash or bother for more than one board and binding.

Rome 390 Boss bindings are a park rat’s dream binding, while maintaining a reasonable price range. These bindings are designed to be lightweight with a playful medium flex, which will allow a riders style and creativity to shine. A newly redesigned FullWrap chassis provides improved power and energy transfer while boosting durability.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: Freestyle
  • Ability Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Flex: Medium
  • Binding Type: strap
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: Limited Lifetime
What we like:
  • Lightweight, playful, and durable while in a reasonable price range.
  • Fullwrap Platform provides max energy transfer while boosting durability.
  • Minimalist strap designs with freestyle riding in mind.
  • 100% nylon highback for playful flex.
  • Adjustable baseplate to accommodate a wider range of boot sizes and models.
What we don’t like:
  • Not compatible with Burton 3D mounting system.
  • Very few options for adjustability.

The highbacks for these bindings are made from 100% nylon, which allows for optimal freestyle focused flex. This makes them ideal for whatever wacky tweak, press, or jib you can come up with, without ever feeling held back or stiffened by your bindings.

You’ll also get Rome’s striped back PureFlex ankle strap and PureGrip toe strap, which feature a lightweight minimalist design with medium flex.

While Now Pilot’s are extremely versatile bindings capable of charging steep backcountry lines, they are also equally as capable of shredding fun park laps. They land themselves in our freestyle category because of Now’s innovative Skate Tech feature. Skate Tech uses a hinge in the centre of the binding which allows a subtle pivot and creates increased board feel, efficiency, and a fun surfy ride.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: Freestyle
  • Ability Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Flex: Adjustable: Soft to Stiff
  • Binding Type: step-in
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: Limited Lifetime
What we like:
  • Customizable on the fly to different terrain conditions because of the interchangeable bushings
  • This has a sweet freestyle/skater feel--loose but firm
  • Less fatigue with the Skate Tech baseplate
  • Can ride with most major brand boards
  • Pretty light feel
What we don’t like:
  • Toe buckle sticks out a little too much

With the option to choose hard or medium bushings, these bindings can be equally suitable for hitting the XL jump line all day long, or top to bottom rail lines where creativity and flow are at their peak. Their Flexhinge 2.0 highback gives you the support you need to lean into grinding edges or ease into a surfing turn.

There’s just a nice transference of control from weight to edge, making the board nicely responsive to your movements.

These snowboarding bindings won’t pigeon-whole you on the resorts. You can rip the slopes on your favorite groomed tracks, sure, but you can also go off-piste and even drop into the bowl with Arbor Hemlocks Freerides.

Beginner boarders with some skating background will like riding on these and more intermediate and expert riders will also enjoy the looser feel, small jumps and dips.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: Freestyle
  • Ability Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Flex: Medium
  • Binding Type: step-in
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, channel capable
  • Warranty: 3 Years
What we like:
  • Minidisc helps with board feel
  • Popping over small lips or in the park are really nice with these
  • Great ankle support
  • Really comfortable
What we don’t like:
  • Locking in with the ratchet buckles isn’t the nicest thing

The Hemlock is a pretty decent binding for the casual rider. Charging in the backcountry will perform less admirably, but there’s so much room to play on these

If you’re a bigger rider, rocking a ridge at speed with these bindings will be awesome. The Union Atlas snowboard bindings have a stiff flex that transfer your movements almost real-time to a stiffer board. It’s a performance binding–that can also match medium boards–for snowboarding backcountry powder, charging passes and butters and tight carving at nice velocity.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: Freeride
  • Ability Level: Intermediate-Advanced
  • Flex: Stiff
  • Binding Type: strap
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: Limited Lifetime
What we like:
  • Adjustable heel loop for different boots
  • Adjustable gas pedal to center boot properly
  • Really responsive
  • Charging powder and kicking big air a dream
  • Wide toe strap to strengthen stiffness
What we don’t like:
  • Toe strap a little too big

Even though it has a really stiff base plate, the new Atlas bindings have a slightly highback. That makes it more compatible with a medium flex board, allowing you to make a match that creates a more versatile marriage between responsiveness that can charge powder, while shock absorption that can help in the half-pipe.

The Atlas might not have as much response as the Union, but the dampness that it has as a consequence makes it just a wee bit more versatile.

Ride burned their designs and started fresh, making revolutionary snowboard bindings for the 2021 season. The C-10 redesign incorporates a nylon composite chassis for serious stiffness and response intended for more advanced riders. The 10 in the name indicates the flex=very stiff.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: Freeride
  • Ability Level: Advanced-Expert
  • Flex: Very Stiff
  • Binding Type: strap
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: 1 year
What we like:
  • LIghtweight with minimal screws
  • Good dampening
  • Adjustable foot beds and heel straps for customized fit
  • Reversible straps give you a choice of all-mountain or freeride profile
  • Comes with two mounting discs for style change
What we don’t like:
  • Thanks to the straps and disc options it’s actually NOT pigeonholed. Otherwise...

The C-series bindings stand for composite and mark themselves different from the A-series, which denotes aluminum. The A-10 binding also has a stiffness of 10 rating, but it’s more responsive; whereas the C-10 is smoother and more damp than the aluminum harness.

The women’s models are called CL, with “L” standing for ladies.

The mold injected straps are strong and are reversible in order to change up the support. This is for different conditions and makes the super stiff flex not super locked into only one kind of terrain or one kind of board for that matter

The Mercury bindings from Jones snowboards are a stiff iteration that is a middle ground product for advanced riders. It’s stiff but has so much shock absorption that only snowboarders who are relaxed will be able to run with it without feeling sleepy. But for those who do, it’s somewhere between a Mustang and a Coupe de Ville.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Riding Style: Freeride or all mountain
  • Ability Level: Advanced-Expert
  • Flex: Stiff
  • Binding Type: strap
  • Compatible Mounting Pattern: 2x4, 4x4, Channel
  • Warranty: Limited Lifetime/1 year complete parts
What we like:
  • Incredible shock absorption
  • Pretty simple run & gun riding experience
  • Good for different terrain
  • Hits a nice point between stiff without hamstringing flex
What we don’t like:
  • Toes strap is harder plastic and can come loose
  • Softer soled boots will feel the pressure from the forward foot bed

With snowboard boots that have a harder sole, riding with these will give a Cadillac Seville experience. That will be super nice on powder and long, luscious carving runs.

At the same time the slight twistiness in the heelback will cater to more flexible boards and ultimately allow for a wider spectrum of terrain. The straps can switch up to change support profiles to customize the flex you need for different styles too.

BUYING GUIDE

Snowboard bindings come in a wide range of styles and options to choose from. Each system, whether it be step-in, step-on, or speed-entry (hybrid), has its own set of pros and cons to navigate. With many important factors to consider when choosing the best pair such as flex, durability, riding style, and entry method, it can seem a little overwhelming.

The best snowboard bindings will be a true love affair with the snowboard they match up with. A soft flex board will do best with soft bindings so the boarding experience is more organic. Similarly, hard bindings match up with a hard board.

Mounting Options

On every set of snowboard bindings, you’ll find a baseplate component which allows the rider to adjust the stance and angle of the bindings to suit their personal preference.

While most snowboard brands will have universal mounting patterns with blot holes which are 2cm x 4cm or 4cm x 4cm, Burton has their own proprietary layouts.

On Burton snowboards, you’ll see either a diamond shaped 3D Bolt Pattern, or the Burton Channel. The Channel system will work with any Burton binding, however it will only work with a few select bindings from other major brands.

Read more about flex and other considerations, including how to adjust your snowboard bindings below.

It’s All About the Flex

What’s the difference between all mountain, freestyle and freeriding? It all depends on your style and the terrain you’re riding.

Just like with snowboards and boots, binding flex can vary wildly between brands and models. Flex is usually measured on a scale from 1 (extremely soft) to 10 (extremely stiff). Although there is an element of personal preference in deciding on flex, it mostly depends on intended riding style.

Freestyle and All-mountain bindings will usually feature a softer flex. This means they will be more forgiving and easier to turn with, which is great for beginners. This would also be desirable for allowing more flexibility while doing tricks in more advanced free-style park riding.

Freeride and Powder snowboard bindings will be much stiffer. A stiff binding will provide improved stability and power when riding at higher speeds. These are more ideal for expert-level riders, or anyone intending to hit the backcountry.

flex snowboard bindings

(Photo screenshot taken from https://www.powderheadz.com/best-snowboard-bindings/)

Before deciding on a pair of bindings, always be sure that they will be compatible with the snowboard you plan to pair them with.

Adjustments

Take a look at one of snowboarding’s best carvers, Ryan Knapton. In the video he’ll guide you through tweaking your bindings to get the best ride. Adjust straps, flex, etc., to get what you want, also while you’re on the mountain.

Entry Method

There are 3 major types of snowboard bindings. These are the traditional step-in, speed-entry (also known as hybrid or rear-entry), and the newest version of step-on bindings.

Step-in: The most common snowboard binding type is the step-in system. These allow the rider to ratchet each strap down to a desired tightness and secure the boot in place.

They provide a high level of adjustability for the individual, however, constantly buckling and unbuckling the straps can be considered a time-wasting nuisance.

Speed Entry (Hybrid): The speed-entry system has a similar appearance to the step-in system, although they prioritize entry efficiency over adjustability. With this system, the high-back reclines to provide easier boot access, then snaps back up into place to secure the boot.

The idea is to set your desired adjustments once, allowing for a quick and easy transition from chair-lift to run. Unfortunately, these bindings are often heavier and provide reduced control in comparison with traditional step-in bindings. Sourcing parts for maintenance will also be a little more tricky for these bindings.

Step-on: The 2017-18 season marked what could be the beginning of the next evolution of snowboard bindings, although it’s still too early to tell for sure. With Burton announcing the comeback of the “step-on” binding system idea, riders were understandably wary. The first time around, the Step-on binding system earned itself a brutal reputation in the past for being a total disaster.

However, coming into the third season that Burton Step-on bindings have been available, the concept seems promising. With a reliable 3-point snapping attachment system, it is easy to step your boot securely into place, no straps required. To dismount, you simply lift the lever on the side and twist your foot to detach.

This system has received mostly good reviews so far, with only a few reported downsides. These include trouble clicking in and out in deep snow, and an annoying clicking sound while riding. Its important to reminder if you are interested in Burton Step-on bindings, you will also be required to buy specific Burton Step-on compatible boots.

Since this is a brand-new technology, many people in the industry refuse to take them seriously yet. But innovation is important and that train keeps on chugging, so we’re excited to see the future of Step-on binding systems.

Men’s Bindings vs Women’s Bindings

The difference between men’s and women’s ski and snowboard gear is a very hot topic at the moment. Woman’s gear is generally regarded as a joke, just like those pink shaving razors that last half as long as the men’s, but are twice the price.

In terms of woman’s gear, the argument is that not all women want to ride around wearing “figure-flattering” jackets with pink flowers. Woman’s gear also seems to lack in the technical aspect, implying that women can’t shred as hard as men do. However, as the market for women’s gear grows, we’re seeing certain brands putting considerable effort into closing that (e)quality gap.

In terms of hard goods, women’s snowboards do tend to be smaller and lighter, with a softer flex than the mens. Some take this as a jab at their weakness, but honestly, it’s more likely to account for their often smaller bodies which usually carry less weight. Since women’s feet are also often smaller and shaped differently than men’s, their boots are designed differently as well.

So this is why buying woman’s snowboard bindings, rather than considering the men’s to be unisex could be helpful. Women’s bindings will be scaled down with slightly smaller sizing and have different strap designs than the men’s, to pair with smaller women’s boots. They will also be slightly softer in flex, making the whole system more consistent.

While women certainly can decide to ride a men’s board and bindings simply by choosing smaller sizes, keep in mind that there are considerations being made to fit women’s unique body type better. While at first women’s gear may truly have seemed ridiculous and even a little insulting, more and more women are getting out there and brands are catching on.

Quality and Maintenance

When considering the quality of any piece of gear, it is usually the safest bet to choose a well-known brand. While it might seem more budget-friendly in the moment to buy from a lesser-known source, it will probably come back to bite you when your bindings fail later on.

The reasons for this are simple. When a company makes much less money than others, they will purchase their materials from a less reliable and cheaper source. This, among other reasons, is how they are able to sell their products for so much less.

While there are a few instances where you might truly pay extra just for the brand name, purchasing gear that your safety relies on usually isn’t one of them. After-all, a sudden binding failure while sliding down a mountain at high-speeds is definitely not an ideal situation.

When it comes to bindings, sticking with the options at different price points from the major brands is recommended. On top of the quality aspect, there is also maintenance to consider. Most shops will be extremely familiar with the maintenance of more common brands.

Availability of parts for repair is a really important aspect here. Most often, a binding failure will happen in the middle of a ride day. In this situation, the ideal solution is to head to a shop in the village for a quick repair and get back out there.

While most shops will have spare parts lying around from major brands, having a lesser known binding brand will usually mean ordering a new part in. In this case, either your day is done, or you’re switching to a beat-up rental setup.

Budget and Riding Style

What brand are your board and boots? Would you consider yourself a beginner, intermediate, or expert level rider? Do you plan on cruising around on green and blue runs, shredding the park and hitting jumps, exploring tree-runs and backcountry areas.. or all of the above?

These are the most important questions to ask yourself when deciding on the price-point and style of bindings to purchase. Each brand will usually provide at least one example of each binding style at a high, low, and medium price-point to choose from.

All mountain: An all mountain rider would be best suited with a medium flex binding. All 3 entry systems mentioned above would serve this category well. The typical all-mountain rider would be beginner or intermediate level riders who is still learning in all styles of snowboarding and exploring the resort.

Freestyle: Freestyle bindings feature a very soft flex. This is most appropriate in park riding, as in hitting jumps and rails. The softer flex provides the rider with a more playful range of motion, making it easier to achieve certain tricks and grabs. This more forgiving feel also accounts for rider error and makes it easier to stomp your landing.

Freeride: Freeride bindings are designed to take a beating with a stiffer and more secure feeling amount of flex. Designed with more expert-level riders in mind, freeride bindings find their place in either technical resort riding, or in the backcountry. These will provide the stability and support needed for quick energy transfers and extreme speeds.

Snowboard Binding Parts and Features

Highback: Provides support and control over the bindings overall flex.

Straps: Fasten over the ankle and toe areas to provide support and response.

Ratchets: Mechanism attached to the strap responsible for tightening over the boot.

Baseplate: The piece which attaches the binding to the board, using bolts. This is used for adjusting stance and binding angle.

Forward Lean Adjuster: Most bindings have a lever on the back of the highback to adjust the highback angle.

Toe Ramp: Some bindings have an adjustable toe ramp which covers the baseplate to provide a more customizable fit.

Heel Cup: The ring at the base of the highback for keeping your heel in place. Some bindings have an adjustable heel cup for a more customizable fit.

Tool Free Adjustment: Nuts and bolts can be adjusted with your fingers, rather than screwdrivers, for on the fly-adjustments.

If you already have a snowboard binding or you just bought one, leave a comment in the comment section below and share your experience with it.

FAQ – Frequently asked questions about snowboard bindings

  • image/svg+xmlimage/svg+xml
    What are the best snowboard bindings for 2021?

    The best snowboard bindings will be different for each rider. Figure out where you will be snowboarding and match your level with the right product. Read our guide for more or look at these top 10 snowboard bindings:

  • image/svg+xmlimage/svg+xml
    What’s the difference between all mountain, freestyle and freeriding?

    It all depends on your style and the terrain you’re riding. Freestyle and All-mountain bindings will usually feature a softer flex. This means they will be more forgiving and easier to turn with, which is great for beginners.

    Here some of the best snowboard bindings for each style:

    ALL MOUNTAIN
    Burton Cartel X
    Union Force
    Bent Metal Axtion
    Flow Fenix

    FREESTYLE
    Salomon Hologram
    Rome 390 Boss
    Now Pilot
    Arbor Hemlock

    FREERIDE
    Union Atlas
    Ride C-10
    Jones Mercury

  • image/svg+xmlimage/svg+xml
    How to set up snowboard bindings?

    On every set of snowboard bindings, you’ll find a baseplate component which allows the rider to adjust the stance and angle of the bindings to suit their personal preference.

    While most snowboard brands will have universal mounting patterns with blot holes which are 2cm x 4cm or 4cm x 4cm, Burton has their own proprietary layouts.

    On Burton snowboards, you’ll see either a diamond shaped 3D Bolt Pattern, or the Burton Channel. The Channel system will work with any Burton binding, however it will only work with a few select bindings from other major brands.

    Read more about flex and other considerations, including how to adjust your snowboard bindings here.

  • image/svg+xmlimage/svg+xml
    How to choose snowboard bindings?

    Snowboard bindings come in a wide range of styles and options to choose from. Read our guide and check out our reviews. Each system, whether it be step-in, step-on, or speed-entry (hybrid), has its own set of pros and cons to navigate.

    With many important factors to consider when choosing the best pair such as flex, durability, riding style, and entry method, it can seem a little overwhelming.

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