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Reviewed by our Gear Geeks:

THE BEST LINE SKIS OF 2021

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Our experts at work

We gave our Gear lovers one job:

Test 21 different Line Skis and write reviews of the best.

The result is 10 of the best Line Skis  on the market today.

hunter bierce

Hunter Bierce

PSIA Ski Instructor
Hunter Bierce is a PSIA Ski Instructor and multidisciplinary outdoor professional.

Bradley Axmith boating & sailing editor

Bradley Axmith

Editor at DIVEIN.com
Vikingship building gear enthusiast and waterworld fanatic.

In the squashed stoke and slush of Spring 2021, Line Skis (as they are wont to do) breathed some much needed levity onto the slopes with their series of wonderfully weird skis.

As far as we can tell, Line seems to be splitting their attention in two directions: Firstly, towards short radius carving skis with the intention of “making the frontside fun again”.

As well as pushing the boundaries of what a park ski can do–not only in the sense of having something skiable outside the rope line, but also in bringing the freestyle attitude to the rest of the mountain.

 

10 Line Skis to look for in 2022

See our quick top 10, or go further down and read our in-depth reviews.

Check out our buying guide in choosing the best Line Skis.

The contemporary classic and best selling model from Line is back again in it’s 107mm waisted incarnation. In short, the SFB is an all-mountain ski that brings a little bit of everything that Line does best.

A little bit of the playful carver shape we see the Sakana, with the lilt and lift you get from their convex-tipped powder models, tied together with Line’s park base makes these skis one of the better rounded options from Line and at large.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Symmetric Flex Pattern
  • Fatty base and edge
  • Multi-Radius Sidecut
  • Convex Tips and Tails
  • Longer Active Edge
  • Partly Cloudy Core (Paulownia and Maple)
  • 176cm, 184cm, 190cm
What we like:
  • One size fits all, all-mountain, single quiver ski
  • Super low weight (1850g)
  • Represents the best of what Line Skis has to offer
What we don’t like:
  • You can’t plow through chop like modern freeride skis

While SFBs can do most things well, they have a hard time keeping up with stiff all-mountain skis when you need to navigate chunky snow or debris fields. But that’s a small price to pay considering the freedom they allow on the rest of the mountain- they’re a veritable passport to anywhere else accessed by a lift.

If you can’t make up your mind about which line ski to choose, then look to the SFB which has taken good elements of all of them.

The Blade takes Line’s incredibly playful and liberated style of skiing and translates it for those who want to keep their skis on the ground. Imagine the punk rock attitude of their park series translated as a carver that flips from edge to edge like a coin.

Similar to their Sakana and Pescado swallowtails, the Blade is built to turn. But it’s more capable of doing so through sloppy snow and hardpack.

 

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Fatty Base and Edge
  • “Gas Pedal Metal” Titanal Sheet
  • Multi-Radius Sidecut
  • Huge Shovel
  • 169cm, 176cm, 181cm variations
What we like:
  • The most traditional and versatile of Line’s fun, turny skis
  • Makes getting on edge more accessible for inexperienced skiiers
  • Reimagining the art of the turn
  • Can turn like the Sakana or the Pescado on firmer snow
What we don’t like:
  • Limited by the specificity of its design
  • Rides a little longer than a typical ski, so size down

Their frontside destroyer status is achieved through an undeniably alien shape. Bulging out from a serviceable 95mm waist all the way to a bulbous 154mm tip, they look more like a canoe oar than a ski.

Combined with conservative rocker and minimal tail taper, the Blade true to fashion has a whole lot of edge to it, and is built more for firm snow than the Sakana or Pescado also listed.

After receiving a bit of a performance touch up in anticipation of last year’s season, the 2022 Blend is bringing all of the same “freestyle/freeride” impact that made it beloved by park denizens. This is for tricksters that also like to take the action where they can find it outside the park.

The Blend specifically approaches the problem by emphasizing park performance while giving you something to work with on the rest of the hill.

 

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Fatty Base and Edge
  • Symmetrical Flex
  • Multi-Radius Sidecut
  • Capwall Construction
  • Carbon Ollie Band
  • 171cm, 178cm, 185cm variaitons
What we like:
  • Gives park skiers a way to split their time on the rest of the hill
  • Good trick ski for natural features
  • Delivers on Line’s promise of a playful attitude
What we don’t like:
  • Falls behind all mountain options when the snow gets chunky or firm
  • Not great for landing big jumps

The Blend lands somewhere in the middle of buttery and burly, making them a notably versatile option for those with a deep repository of park tricks.

They balance bendability with a low swing weight and reasonable support on landing, but for that reason you probably want to avoid flying too high unless you’re confident in your ability to land soundly and consistently.

Line’s twin, swallowtail sweethearts are back again this season, and boy can they turn! And then some. Most at home plunging in and out of soft snow like an upstream salmon, the Pescado’s iconic tail keeps your shovels out of the snow and favoring a high-sailing, surfy feel.

They also allow you to mount the ski back from center without sacrificing aft stability, as the rigid titanal swallowtail tips add a little extra edge you’d otherwise miss.

 

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Directional Flex
  • Multi Radius Sidecut
  • Swallowtail
  • 180 cm
What we like:
  • Super unique powder ski that planes out
  • Reinventing the turn
  • Ski for all skill levels
What we don’t like:
  • Swallowtail isn’t as resilient as other tail shapes
  • Limited to a relatively tight turn radius

These are definitely soft snow skis. To be sure, on hard pack or crust you’d feel a bit of a “fish out of water” and that’s alright. Unless you’re living somewhere that sees multiple daily inches or only hits the slopes after a big storm, they’re a bit of a specialty piece that will spend a lot of time in the garage or the roof box. But, when conditions are right, it’s hard to find skis that are as much fun to ride.

A far more versatile yet no less fun alternative to the Pescado, the Sakana is everything you’d expect out of a carving ski from Line. Taking major notes from the Blade listed above
(the oversized shovel and aggressive sidecut) this ski is practically aching to get up on edge.

Regardless of skill level, skiers should have no trouble laying squiggly, convoluted sets of railroad tracks down tame to tough slopes.

 

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Directional Flex
  • Multi-Radius Sidecut
  • Swallowtail
  • Carbon Flax Tape
  • Early rise
  • 166cm, 174cm, 181cm variations
What we like:
  • Bringing the frontside of skiing back into the limelight
  • Surprisingly versatile given its shape
  • Rip hard turns side to side in a tight radius
What we don’t like:
  • Doesn’t hold up well on icy or super variable terrain.
  • Not the best option for powder days

“Sakana” comes from the Japanese term referring to a small snack customarily served with alcohol, maybe Line is trying to tell us something here. As far as we’re concerned, it epitomizes everything that has made Line the iconic ski brand they are today, emphasizing fun and never taking itself too seriously.

It’s hard to have a better time on shallow sluff or soft spring slough.

Though the Sakana has earned its salt both on and off piste, you’re better off looking for something a little more traditional for big bad lines and bad conditions.

It’s easy to recognize a dedicated powder ski. Though there’s a lot of talk about optimization and getting the most out of your post-storm slashes, when it comes down to it, it’s all about the minor details separating the best from the rest–a surprisingly subtle “hint of Line”.

Featuring acclaimed “convex base technology” the Outline is a featherweight behemoth ready to give you more float and fun for your run down any face with decent coverage.

 

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Fatty Base and Edge
  • Symmetric Center Balanced Flex Pattern
  • Sidewall Construction
  • Convex Tips and Tails
  • Longer Active Edge
  • 5Cut Multi Radius Sidecut
  • Partly Cloudy Core
What we like:
  • Lightweight powder ski that brings Line’s playful attitude to the table
  • Diminutive weight for how big the ski is
  • Tricky powder ski that lets you bring freestyle attitude to the deep powder
What we don’t like:
  • Not the best option for anything but powder
  • A little flexible for heavy or variable snow

True to form, the Outline takes a playful approach to its ends. Its twin tip build coupled with a generous amount of flex and convex tips and tails lend themselves to a smooth and loose feel while laying fresh tracks and cruising back to the chairlift, though they heavily favor a centered stance which could very well take some getting used to.

Weighing in at an impressive 2030g per ski, they also serve as a reasonable touring ski for deep, low-consequence lines.

Lightweight freeride skis are a hot ticket item nowadays, particularly those with a wide waist, ones that feel a lot heavier underfoot than in your hand. The Vision is on the stiffer end for skis in this style, giving you more support underfoot for steeps and soft but uncertain landings.

We’d recommend the Vision 118 as a wide touring ski or a resort powder ski for people looking to cut down on fatigue and aren’t as concerned about throwing tricks.

 

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • 5Cut Multi Radius
  • Sidewall Construction
  • Directional Flex
  • THC Construction
  • Partly Cloudy Core (Paulownia and Maple)
What we like:
  • Lightweight yet directional, feels heavier than it is
  • Supportive tails for landing drops
  • Skis more intuitively than Line’s other powder oriented options
What we don’t like:
  • Can’t charge through chunky snow
  • On the less playful side of Line’s catalog

To say that the Vision is Line’s answer to Atomic’s Bent Chetler wouldn’t be inaccurate, but that’s not the whole story. The Vision is constructed in a way more conducive to going straight down the hill, offering more stability and support if less “trickability.”

If you’re after more versatility, the rest of the Vision series includes offerings at 108 and 98mm alternatives.

As trends change and technology improves, we see skiers who want something less specialized. Something that’s not necessarily adept, but at least adequate in any terrain they choose.

The latest iteration of the Chronic (circa 2019) with this year’s ferocious tiger topsheets are a great daily choice for 50/50 frontside-freestyle skiers, or those who want something a little tougher than they typically get from Line for riding rails.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Fatty base and edge
  • Symmetric Flex
  • 5Cut Multi Radius Turn
  • Capwall Construction
  • Maple Macroblock Core
What we like:
  • Serviceable all-mountain ski that still rips the park
  • Super tough and durable compared to other Line park skis
What we don’t like:
  • Doesn’t butter as well as the Blend or other, softer park skis

The last few seasons we’ve seen a lot of toeing the “Line” between park skis and all mountain rippers.The Chronic is a classic ski from Line, and like the Blend above is sitting somewhere between the park boundary and the rest of the mountain.

However, where the Blend is soft and accommodating of some more bendy and buttery freestyle tricks, the Chronic gives you a little more to work with in variable snow.

There’s no denying Line’s rapport in Freestyle skiing. The Tom Wallisch Pro model– the once much-anticipated and now long-celebrated, dedicated freestyle ski in their lineup–remains the most trusted model from Line for hitting XL park features.

But these skis don’t just go big, they’re on the aggressive side of a freestyle swiss army knife, but any seasoned trick skier should be able to bend, slide and otherwise slay these skis anyway they imagine.

 

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Fatty Base and Edge
  • Multi Radius Side Cut
  • Capwall Construction
  • Carbon Ollie Band
  • 157cm, 164cm, 171cm, 178cm variations
What we like:
  • Serious park skis that can also carve with the best of them
  • Packed full of features with a pretty traditional construction
  • Tip and tail taper can save you from some nasty slams
What we don’t like:
  • Wood sidewalls aren’t as strong as the newfangled ABS ones
  • There are other super light skis from Line with a lower swing weight

Given the reputation of the pro backing them, the Tom Wallisch should be on the shortlist of any serious park rider looking for a new ski to blow up. But what really sets them apart is a unique tip and tail taper.

The edges on either end of the ski are designed to be forgiving when landing rotation, so you don’t catch an edge and slam when you don’t quite bring your spin around.

Though it’s a mainstay in their lineup, the Sick Day is a much more traditional take on a ski than we’ve come to expect from Line.

In terms of ice cream, if the SFB, Sakana, and Vision represent the weirdest and most wonderful flavors available at your local creamery, the Sick Day is vanilla. There’s nothing wrong with vanilla, some people love it; but the best thing that can be said about it is it’s a safe bet.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Directional Flex
  • 5Cut Multi Radius
  • Capwall Construction
  • Carbon Magic Finger
  • Aspen Core
What we like:
  • Dependable, predictable, affordable
  • Great learner ski for skiers moving towards intermediate skill levels
What we don’t like:
  • Feels pretty dead on the snow compared to other Line skis
  • Limited by terrain at a certain point

Forgiveness is the most tangible benefit one receives from the Sick Day, and for that reason it’s a great option for burgeoning skiers to cut their teeth. One retains the ability to make engaging medium radius turns with the option to bail into a smeared slash at any time. This feeling carries to other ski-specific situations, in terms of pop, pivot, and powder performance one can expect middling results from the Sick Day.

There are skis that you can take into the park, and then there are skis that you never want to take out of the park. The Honey Badger is everything that a playful freestyle ski should be: durable, lightweight, and cheap. 

While they’re much too soft for the pipe and bigger kickers, the Honey Badger should catch the imagination of anyone who loves rails, presses and spinning off of mid-sized features.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Fatty base and edges
  • Multi Radius Sidecut
  • 4D Fibercap Construction
  • Aspen Veneer Core
  • 155cm, 166cm, 172cm, 177cm variations
What we like:
  • Rugged park skis with plenty of flex in the shovels
  • Really good quick rotation on rails due to their low swing weight
  • Can absorb some prolonged abuse
What we don’t like:
  • Can’t be dependably ridden outside of the park for more than a few laps

As the name implies, these skis are tough and can handle some prolonged time in the park. The best park skier I know has an old pair of Honey Badgers that he refuses to let die. While I can’t condone skiing with six inches of edge ripped out, he claims that it just makes it harder to hook an edge. 

The other notable feature about the Honey Badger is their ridiculously low swing weight, an enticing feature for snappy spins off of smaller features.

For all that they’re capable of inside of the rope line, the Honey Badger is by no means a daily driver for the average skier. The soft tips and tails bend too easily to engage a carved turn. But for people who spend every day in the park, they’re an affordable and fun option that can handle anything you throw at them.

The Sick Day is a ski that gives back whatever you put into it. Which sounds like a copout, but  really just speaks to the versatility of this well-rounded tool. With a more traditional mount point and a more traditional attitude than most Line skis, there’s a Sick Day out there for any skier, but the 104 is our pick for the most well-rounded Line skis.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Directional flex keeps some stiffness behind the foot for driving power
  • Multi-Radius Sidecut
  • Capwall Construction
  • Carbon Magic Fingers
  • 172cm, 179cm, 186cm
What we like:
  • Affordable and versatile performance ski
  • Can be ridden anywhere for basically any purpose, very well rounded
What we don’t like:
  • Lack of any particular specialization means it doesn’t excel in any one place

The Sick Day splits the difference in terms of stiffness. It doesn’t have as much driving power as you’d think an “all-mountain” ski would, but Line is great at selling what some would consider faults as features. It doesn’t ski like a charger because they want to evoke a more inventive and playful style of skiing as opposed to bulldozing everything in your path. 

It’s a ski with a wide range of appeal for its versatility and practicality. It can be used reasonably for nearly any discipline of alpine skiing, and is light enough to do some touring in. In terms of options for a single ski season, the Sick Day 104 by Line Skis can get any job done with reasonable performance benefits.

The Vision 98 is a pretty straightforward ski, which in a way is a major curve ball coming from Line Skis. The entire series is competitively light compared to any ski, not to mention within the freeride category. Because of the weight, we think that the Vision 98 makes the most sense as a playful, poppy, touring ski for low-consequence slopes.

Where to buy:
Specs & Features:
  • Multi-Radius Sidecut
  • “Triple Hybrid Construction”
  • Blended Maple and Paulowina core
  • 172cm 179cm, 186cm
What we like:
  • Crazy light ski in the same class as a lot of dedicated touring options
  • Great soft snow skis, and can hold their own on powder despite the narrow waist
What we don’t like:
  • Prone to deflection in icy conditions
  • You might want something wider for touring in powder

The shape of the Vision 98 is pretty close to a twin tip, but with a generous shovel and some directional influence retained in the tail. Their narrow waist makes them a more well-rounded option than the 118s, and their wide tips make it possible to plane out on deep snow once you gather a little speed.

They also feature Line’s super stable “THC Construction” method. But just because they’re damp doesn’t mean you can fly into a field of death cookies and expect to emerge unscathered. They are a great ski for spring corn touring or soft snow days at the resort, but they also require a little bit of thinking about your line when the conditions are less than ideal.

Guide to Line Skis

Before getting into the specs and story bits, check out Tom Wallisch demonstrate how playful and possible look easy in his Line skis:

 

Line Skis Tech Specs

Multi-Radius Sidecut

The sidecut of your ski determines what kind of turns they’ll naturally make when tipped on to their edge. Less pronounced sidecuts will result in a bigger turn radius, while more pronounced sidecuts lend themselves to tighter, more aggressive turns. 

It’s not uncommon for all-mountain skis to be shaped to accommodate two or three different turn radiuses.

While the concept of a multi-radius sidecut isn’t anything new, but it’s seldom executed to the degree that Line takes it. 

Their proprietary “5Cut” design is exactly what it sounds like: a unique shape to their ski that lends itself towards a wide range of different turn shapes. The one caveat is that the models with this design usually aren’t stiff enough to make super aggressive GS turns.

 

Fatty Base and Edge

One of the most anxiety-provoking aspects of buying a new ski is the dreaded coreshot, or worse, a ripped out edge. While you can’t yet file a rock-insurance claim on your new skis, you can build a better ski that’s more resistant to such eventualities.

Line’s “Fatty Base and Edge” are thicker-than-typical take on than you’d suspect from the lightweight construction we’re seeing out of Line’s ski catalogue.

This makes them more resistant to rails, rocks, stumps, and whatever other carnage you may face. A thicker base also means you can get a few more grinds out of your skis before the shop tecs get nervous. 

Carbon Ollie Band

When you’re doing the type of skiing that begets Line’s products, there’s a good chance you’re really going to be bending your skis aggressively. Over time your skis are going to lose their natural pop, and no one wants to ride dead skis.

Line’s “Ollie Band” is a way to retain some of the spring and pop on your favorite pair of skis. The pre-stretched carbon bands that run down the center of the skis do a better job of keeping their shape over time.

Carbon Magic Fingers

Carbon is a useful material for ski construction due to its weight and its shape retention properties. Line makes good use of it in skis like the Blend and the Sick Day series. For lightweight, turn-oriented or all-mountain skis, these carbon stringers add stability without the use of a heavy metal plate.

THC Construction

Triple Hybrid Construction is yet another dampening technique from Line. It’s a three layer ply of carbon, aramid, and fiberglass. This blend offers a way to provide some of the weight benefits of a carbon dominant ski.

Line claims that the three materials absorb different vibrational frequencies, meaning a more stable ride over a greater variety of conditions.

Splitting up some of the carbon distribution also gives the ski a little more resistance to the kind of deflective ride that carbon-heavy skis are likely to provide.

 

On Line Skis

Line was founded by then-student Jason Levinthal in 1995 when action sports were really catching stride in the eye of the public. From its inception Line was intended to be a counterpoint to the formal and rigid ski culture that just couldn’t seem to keep up with the rest of the industry.

Their DIY ethic literally started in a garage that produced what we would now call “ski-blades” that incorporated some of the first examples of twin tip technology.

The next 10 years were a whirlwind of successes and innovations. Line released a series of award-winning park and pipe skis, along with one of the first proper, full-sized twin tips ever to hit the market. Line was purchased by K2 in the mid 2000’s. Ideologically this is a great fit.

K2’s innovative spirit gave Line the freedom, and more importantly the funding to keep pushing boundaries every step of the way. You don’t have to look very hard to see how K2’s earlier innovations undoubtedly influenced Line, and how Line’s first “skiboard” prototypes are paid homage to in K2’s “Fatty”.

Most skiers around my age know Line as the sponsor from the Traveling Circus webseries. The series was many young winter sports enthusiasts’ introduction to the ski bum dream, glamorizing a nomadic lifestyle and the debauched living conditions that come with it. It was a de-glamorized look at the rambling ski dream and remains immensely popular, with 13 seasons and counting filmed so far.

Putting the Best Kit Together

Line Skis are somewhat of an outlier, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find great ski bindings to match up with their skis’ profiles. Similarly, the big names like Nordica and Salomon in the ski boot market have heavy hitters that can keep up with Line’s aggressive products.

The only other equipment that Line currently makes, besides apparel, is poles.  That allows them to stay fresh, specialized and unique (despite them being a subsidiary of K2).

FAQ – Frequently asked questions about Line Skis

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    Are Line Skis good?

    Line has proven to take an anything but traditional approach to most disciplines of skiing, and their overwhelming presence in the freestyle world should speak for itself. Classic skis like the Honey Badger and the Chronic, as well as brand new models like the Sakana are considered top contenders within their respective categories.

    For more information on Line, their best skis, and how they make them with such a high degree of integrity, take a look at our brand overview page.

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    Where are Line Skis made?

    Line skis are conceptualized and initially tested in the Pacific Northwest, though all manufacturing is done in the same Chinese factory as K2, their parent company. To see what we think of Line’s quality and some of our favorite options in their catalogue, check out our brand overview page.

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    What are the best Line skis?

    Line, at this point, has reached contemporary classic ski status. Respected as innovators in the industry their always playful catalogue of skis is full of innovative ways to slide down the hill. For more of our favorites as well as a deeper look at Line Skis and the technology that makes them great, check out our brand profile page.

    5 Best Line Skis

    • Sir Francis Bacon
    • Blade
    • Blend
    • Sakana
    • Pescado
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    What are Line skis known for?

    Line primarily has been known for their freestyle and park skis like the Chronic and the Tom Wallisch Pro Model. Though still favored within the confines of the terrain park, Line has a full fleet of all-mountain, powder, and carving skis worthy of anyone’s quiver.

    For more information on Line skis, as well as our selection of the best they have to offer head over to our brand overview page. 

If you already have a line ski or you just bought one, leave a comment in the comment section below and share your experience with it.

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