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summer worsley

Editor at DIVEIN.com
Vikingship building gear enthusiast and waterworld fanatic.

PRODUCT REVIEW

Gill Deckhand Long Finger Sailing Gloves

The Gill Deckhand Long Finger sailing glove is a solid choice for recreational sailor. The reliability of this product rests in its value and durability and comfort during both the summer and autumn seasons.

It’s a versatile glove that can be used for paddle sports and fishing as well, making it a useful bit of kit that’s got a middle-of-the-pack price with a better than the rest performance.

The fingerless index and thumb allow for dextrous tasks like tying knots and plotting courses or lighting your pipe.

I’ve used this glove over the last 6 years or so, buying a new pair after 3 years because of wear and tear. Read this in-depth review to find out how they performed and if it’s a good offering for your boating (or water sports needs)

Our Overall Review

We have thoroughly tested - and read reviews from other experts and users. In summary, this is what we think:

4.5

Reasons to buy

  • Comfortable flex
  • Quality manufacturing that keeps the seams from splitting
  • Wide neoprene wrist closure
  • Fingerless index and thumb makes executing tasks easier
  • Wraparound palm protection
  • Inside facing velcro wrist strap doesn’t get snagged on jacket or watch
  • Versatile during changing temperatures (especially in northern climates)

Reasons NOT to buy

  • They will get worn down after a couple of seasons’ worth of heavy use (but hey, who doesn’t)

Overview

The Gill Deckhand Longfinger glove is a great performer for boating and especially sailing smaller crafts. There are cheaper sailing gloves that most seldom sailors will use and not think twice about, but for more constant use, the Gill Deckhands have proven to be a workhorse that has the right design features for maximum functionality and really impressive comfort.

The long finger model of these provides a little more warmth deeper into the fall season, while allowing for tying knots with dexteritous finesse, including even fishing lines. The short finger model does an even better job but are better suited for warmer climes.

Gill Marine is a sailing company that has been selling gear since the 70s. Indications of this company’s innovation are evident in the manufacturing of the fabric. The way the seams are placed away from points of pressure, where friction and abrasion are at their most common point of contact, speaks to the maritime experience of the designers.

This is a professional glove made for recreational use, the contradiction of which exists only insofar that the price of the product is smaller than its quality. Rather, for racers or chronic boaters, this deckhand sailing glove is a proven commodity of proven quality.

I’ve used these for years sailing on a Viking ship, working the big anchor by pulling tarred lines, pulling the halyard and sheets, as well as dinghy sailing and on fiberglass boats. My hands, palms and fingertips can attest to the protection they provide, while my shipmates can attest to my proficiency in tying knots with them.

See the complete list of the best Sailing Gloves here!

gill deckhand gloves overview

Gill Deckhand Long Finger Sailing Gloves: Key Specifications

  • Materials: neoprene, amara suede, microfiber
  • Spring, Summer and Fall seasons

Where to Buy:

Materials

Gill describes a 4-way stretch about knuckles to wrist fabric, part of the Gill Fabric System which they say offers a 50+ UV protection against the sun. During the warmest summer months of sailing, I can at least attest to never once getting any sun burn on my hands with my Deckhand gloves on.

This fabric on the back of the hand feels a lot like some kind of mesh material. It’s a type of microfiber that doesn’t absorb water while I’ve found it very breathable.

There’s neoprene around the wrists, which is great for when yours get swollen or for people with bad circulation. A fastener made of velcro placed under the wrist has a small profile to avoid getting in the way of watch or cuffs.

The material wrapped around the palm and fingers is described as having a double-layer Amara reinforced fabric. Amara is a type of faux-leather simulacram that looks a lot like suede and is fairly durable.

One great advantage of the Amara material is its ability to dry quickly. So, quick to dry and great at protecting makes the Deckhand great for constant use in changing weather conditions.

gill deckhand gloves materials photo

Summary

Gill Deckhand Long Finger sailing gloves are made by sailors for sailors. The bottom line is that they have tested great and are the editor’s choice because they are a proven product at sea.

The no seam fingers and wraparound-the-palm Amara material saves your hands abuse from salt, cold and friction, while still allowing for execution of manual tasks with finesse.

The price is so competitive given the quality of the construction and how its materials provide advantages when racing, paddling or boating or cruising. According Nick Gill, the founder, they can do it cheaper because they make it themself (refreshing in an age of outsourcing).

Proprietary materials here also make this an all-season sailing glove, providing warmth in the fall and winter, while giving protection from the sun and breathability during the summer. But for a true winter glove, the Gill Pro is a thicker and better alternative.

Bear in mind that they will start to fray after a couple of seasons. The seams won’t split, but don’t expect them to be invincible.

It’s a great sailing glove and one, we can say from experience, that won’t disappoint.

About Gill Marine Apparel

Nick Gill is a british sailor and pioneer in the area of maritime apparel. He sailed small open-topped boats from 5 years old, starting out in the 70s at a time when there wasn’t much as far as technical clothing for recreational mariners went.

There was no technical gear for civilians at all and the young Nick Gill, who was a business student, started what was a dinghy gear company.

Gill started working on the waterproof aspect of sailing gear, focusing on the seams to keep water out. He lived in a textile heartland near Nottingham, which gave him access to fabric-making expertise.

In 1983 he had bought the first of several hot air taping machines to seal textiles and make them watertight. Understanding how saltwater affects waterproof seals, Gill added layers and continuously tweaked their designs, constantly improving, innovating.

Later in the 80s he expanded his range of apparel to boots, gloves and fleece layers. Gill Marine hasn’t looked back bringing innovation that stems from a well-amassed experience.

See the complete list of the best Sailing Gloves here!

 

What We Like

  • Comfortable flex
  • Quality manufacturing that keeps the seams from splitting
  • Wide neoprene wrist closure
  • Fingerless index and thumb makes executing tasks easier
  • Wraparound palm protection
  • Inside facing velcro wrist strap doesn’t get snagged on jacket or watch
  • Versatile during changing temperatures (especially in northern climates)
  • Wraparound fingertip seams for dexterity and comfort
  • Relatively quick to dry

What We Don’t Like

  • They will get worn down after a couple of seasons’ worth of heavy use (but hey, who doesn’t)

Where to Buy:

Where to Buy:

FAQ – Frequently asked questions about Gill Deckhand Long Finger Sailing Gloves

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    What are the best sailing gloves?

    Depending on the amount of sailing one does and the type of sailing too, the best sailing gloves will be made for activity, temperature and price.

    Among the established companies that make technical sailing gear these are the best:

    • Gill Deckhand Long Finger sailing gloves
    • Helly Hansen Unisex Sailing Glove
    • Musto Performance Sailing Short Finger Gloves
    • WindRider Pro Sailing Gloves
    • MRX Boxing & Fitness Sticky Sailing Gloves
    • NeoSport 3/4 Finger Neoprene Gloves
    • Harken Reflex Gloves
    • Gill Championship Sailing Gloves
    • FitsT4 Sailing Gloves 3/4 Finger
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    How to wash sailing gloves?

    Most sailing gloves, like the Gill Deckhand model, should be rinsed after saltwater exposure and hung to dry. To wash them, do it in warm water with detergent for delicates. Most of the better sailing gloves, even though they are made of quality materials, should be washed this way.

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    Who makes the best sailing gear?

    Technical sailing gear for recreational use only started to be manufactured and sold in the 70s. Since the 80s, Helly Hansen, Musto, Henri Lloyd and Gill Marine are still around and still producing foul weather gear and technical sports apparel for sailing and boating. They are market leaders in sailing gloves and waterproof racing jackets.

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